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The Top List of Cheerleading Moves and Cheer Stunts

Cheerleading Moves and Cheer Stunts the Ultimate List

The foundations of cheerleading are straightforward but essential to learn. Nailing down the correct strategy of no-frills cheerleading movements will permit you to move to more refined skills and assure you are safe. In addition, this piece will demystify how to perform cheerleading for newbies.

 

Tumbling

Tumbling is one of the most exciting aspects of cheering, but it is also one of the most difficult for cheerleaders to learn. Although cheerleaders do not compete in handstands as part of their performance, being able to throw round-offs and back handsprings requires a flawless handstand. 

 

Running tumbling passes start with a round-off and are frequently followed by a back handspring. These two talents build up a tumbling pass that will culminate in a more difficult skill, such as a back tuck, layout, full, or double full. As a result, cheerleaders must practice these three novice cheering maneuvers.

 

Back handspring

Begin by bending your legs into a sitting situation and swinging your arms behind you. Keep your chest high throughout this step. Next, swing your arms up and jump back into the handspring as you stand up from the squat. You will reach the handstand posture at the peak of the handspring. It is critical to keep your arms straight and close to your ears to avoid striking your head. Check that your core is firm and that your legs are together. Next, lift your chest and snap both feet down. Your arms should remain near your ears till the skill is completed.

 

Round-off

Determine which way you will turn your hands in the round-off before you begin. For example, if you begin the round-off with your left leg in front, your hands will be turned to the left. However, starting with your right leg in front, you will turn your hands to the right.

 

Begin in the same lunge stance you started on your handstand, with your arms by your ears. Lift your rear leg and reach towards the floor simultaneously. Turn your hands 90 degrees to the left or right as they are ready to contact the floor. Continue your rotation with the remaining leg until you are in a handstand posture. Next, you’ll make another 90-degree rotation and elevate your chest as you snap both feet down. When you accomplish the skill, you should be facing the opposite direction you came from, having completed a 180-degree turn. Your arms should remain near your ears till the skill is completed.

 

Handstand

Begin by putting one leg directly ahead of you. Your front leg should be in a lunge, while your rear leg should be straight. Which leg you position in front is decided by which hand you write with, but ultimately, you must choose which leg feels the most comfortable bringing you into the handstand. Your arms should remain near your ears till the skill is completed.

 

Lift your rear leg and reach towards the floor simultaneously. Kick yourself into a handstand. Your entire body should be tight in the handstand. Hold it in place for 1-3 seconds. Bring your front leg down first when you’re ready to come down. Finish the technique by landing in a lunge with your arms by your ears.

 

Stunts

Stunting necessitates collaboration since four cheerleaders must collaborate to do a stunt. A stunt group comprises one flyer, two side bases, and one back place. Of course, a front zone is always preferable, but it is not needed. Once your group has mastered a few basic and straightforward cheer stunts, you will be ready to advance to more challenging feats.

 

Start all fundamental cheerleading tricks by standing shoulder-to-shoulder with the side bases in front. Next, the flyer should take a position behind the bases, with the back slot directly behind him.

 

Thigh-stand

Back spot:

  1. Begin by grabbing the flyer by the waist.
  2. Assist her in climbing to the top of the thigh stand.
  3. Wait until she is securely back on the floor before releasing the flier.

 

Side bases: Squat into a deep lunge, inside leg bent, outer leg straight. The bases must come together to form a sturdy footing for the flyer to stand on. Make sure the legs of the bases are lined correctly from the knee to the foot.

When the flyer enters the thigh stand, the side bases will loop their inside arms behind her knees. To establish a stable footing, both bases will place their other hand beneath the ball of the flyer’s foot. For more advanced groups, bases can make a high-V motion with their outer arm.

 

Flyers: Begin with one foot on the base’s thigh and both hands on the base’s shoulders. Dip, push off the bases, and place the remaining foot on the thigh of the opposite base. Squeeze and stand up straight. At the apex of the stunt, make a high-V move.

 

Prep or Half

Back spot:

  1. Begin by grabbing the flyer by the waist.
  2. Place your hands on the flyer’s glutes and drive her to the peak of the stunt as she jumps into the smoosh position.
  3. When she reaches the top, grab her ankles and gently pull up to help the bases support the flyer’s weight.

 

Side bases: Face each other first. The bases must come together to form a sturdy footing for the flyer to stand on. Bases will squat with both legs, maintaining their chest high and core tight for the entire duration. Arms should be angled at the elbow, and one hand should be placed over the other.

 

When the flyer leaps in, the bases will lower their legs, stand up, and raise the flyer into a prep. The flyer’s feet are expected to be precisely under the chins of the bases.

 

Flyers: Start by grasping the shoulders of the bases. Flyers can begin with one foot in the base’s hand or bounce into the stunt with both feet, depending on the preferences of the stunt group.

 

Enter the stunt with both legs bent and ankles together. This is known as a “smoosh” or “squish.” Next, push off the shoulders of the bases, rise up, and squeeze from this posture. At the peak of the prep, make a high-V motion.

 

Extension

The stunt group will do the identical movements as the prep; however, the bases and back spot will extend their arms straight, advancing the prep to a full elongation.

 

Jumps

Cheerleading relies heavily on jumps. Each team’s routine includes a jump part, so it’s critical to master good jump technique and ensure you can execute leaps on the correct count. All leaps should be done to the beat of an 8-count. 

 

A jump section consists of a toe touch, a hurdler, and a pike jump. While novices may only take one leap at a time, upper-level teams can complete two or more jumps in a row. The actions described in this article will be essential for correctly executing these cheer techniques.

 

When starting a leap, two sets of motions are typically employed. Each action and its designated count are listed below.

 

High-V Approach

  1. Clasp.
  2. Hit your high V.
  3. Squat down and take a seat. Bring both of your arms down ahead of you, one fist on top of the other, without sinking your chest.
  4. Execute the jump.

5-6. Land with your feet together.

7-8. Stand up clean. Arms should be by your side.

 

This approach is used for entry into toe touches.

 

Toe Touch

To begin your toe touch, choose one of the jump entries.

 

Jump out of the squat and elevate both legs into a straddling posture. Perform a sharp T-motion. Check that your chest is up, your legs are straight, and your toes are pointed. Bring your legs down and your arms close by your side. Finish the jump by landing with both feet together.

 

Cone-Motion Approach

  1. Clasp.
  2. Hit your cone motion.
  3. Squat down and take a seat. Bring your cone motion down directly ahead of you, hands clasped and chest raised.
  4. Execute the jump.

5-6. Land with your feet together.

7-8. Stand up clean. Arms should be by your side.

 

This approach is used for entry into hurdlers and pike jumps. It also can be used for entry into toe touches.

 

Hurdler (left and right)

 

Begin the leap using the cone-motion method.

 

Jump out of the squat and straighten either your left or right leg directly ahead of you. The aim is to raise your front leg to your chest without dropping your chest. Keep your chest high and your gaze forward. Bend your knee and kick your rear leg behind you. Both legs should reach these positions simultaneously. Make a quick landing motion, but keep it somewhat directly ahead of you (as opposed to your arms being by your ears). Check that your legs are straight and your toes are pointed. Bring your legs down and your arms in close by your side. Finish the jump by landing with both feet together.

 

Pike

Begin the leap using the cone-motion method.

 

Jump out of the squat and straighten both legs directly ahead of you into a pike stance. You are permitted to lower your chest to meet your legs at the height of this leap. The action will resemble a touchdown, but your arms should be straight ahead. Check that your legs are straight and your toes are pointed. Bring your legs down and your arms in close by your side. Finish the jump by landing with both feet together.

 

Motions

The most fundamental cheering maneuvers are motions, which are simple arm movements. The clasp, high V, T-motion, touchdown, and cone are performance’s most commonly utilized cheer actions. Therefore, it is critical to practice the correct technique for each move and to execute each one precisely.

 

Clasp

Cheerleaders clap with the clasp. Begin with your arms at your sides. Bend your elbows, cup your hands together, and clap. It is critical to remember that you should raise your arms up squarely directly ahead of your body from your side. Check that your clasp is directly ahead of your face and that your elbows are together.

 

High-V

Lift your arms to resemble the letter “V” to do a high V. Straighten your arms and position them slightly directly ahead of your torso. Make a tight fist with your hands and turn your fingers away from the body.

 

T-Motion

Begin with your arms at your sides. Raise your arms to form the letter “T.” The arms should be straight and somewhat in front of the torso. Make a tight fist with your hands, fingers facing the floor.

Touchdown

Lift your arms till they are above your head to make a touchdown gesture. Straighten your arms and make sure your biceps are touching your ears. Make a tight fist with your hands, fingers facing each other.

 

Cone

While the cone motion is not commonly employed in a motion segment, it is used to enter cheerleading leaps. The cone action is quite similar to the touchdown motion; however, your hands should be clasped at the apex of the motion.

 

Learn Cheerleading Today!

Now that you know the proper technique for cheerleading moves for beginners, it’s time to enroll in our cheerleading classes today! Our expert instructors will help you learn how to do competitive cheer and stun your opponents with your exceptional new skills. So don’t wait any longer – sign up now and start your journey to becoming a superstar cheerleader!

 

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